Categories
15mm wargames figures, Peter Laing 15mm vintage 15mm

Peter Laing mentions in March 1973 Wargamers Newsletter 132

Donald Featherstone writes in the March 1973 Wargamers Newsletter :

“… You just could not resist a new army in Laing’s or Miniature Figurines 15mm scale …”

I am curious as to when the first Minifigs 15mm ranges were produced, as Peter Laing is often claimed to be the first maker or pioneer of 15mm figures in October 1972.

Image source: Wargamers Newsletter scans

https://www.fourcats.co.uk/mags/files/WGN-132-Mch-73.pdf

Peter Laing himself offers conversion tips on low melt solder – would this have been part of his sculpting method?

Advert in March 1973 introducing his new 200 Range, his second range, of Feudals 11-12th Century AD beginning with Normans and Saracens for Hastings, Crusades …

This new range and future AWI and Crimean and Ancients ranges are mentioned by Peter Laing to Donald Featherstone for the “Must List” review section:

These became the 200 Feudal range

300 AWI Range

400 Ancients Range

But the Crimean figures would not appear for a while as the 800 Range

*

By 26soldiersoftin

Hello I'm Mark Mr MIN, Man of TIN. Based in S.W. Britain, I'm a lifelong collector of "tiny men" and old toy soldiers, whether tin, lead or childhood vintage 1960s and 1970s plastic figures.
I randomly collect all scales and periods and "imagi-nations" as well as lead civilians, farm and zoo animals. I enjoy the paint possibilities of cheap poundstore plastic figures as much as the patina of vintage metal figures.
Befuddled by the maths of complex boardgames and wargames, I prefer the small scale skirmish simplicity of very early Donald Featherstone rules.
To relax, I usually play solo games, often using hex boards. Gaming takes second place to making or convert my own gaming figures from polymer clay (Fimo), home-cast metal figures of many scales or plastic paint conversions. I also collect and game with vintage Peter Laing 15mm metal figures, wishing like many others that I had bought more in the 1980s ...

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s