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15mm wargames figures, Peter Laing 15mm vintage 15mm

Peter Laing 15mm Wargamers Newsletter December 1973 – the little woman, the benefits of 15mm and the new Colonial 600 series

The December 1973 advert by Peter Laing in Wargamers Newsletter is both a chatty bit of 1970s humour (of the sitcom sort) and a clever cheeky argument for the cheapness and space-saving nature of his 15mm figures.

The little woman – the better half?

Obviously few could envisage in 1973 a world with female gamers or indeed wives who were wargamers. Admittedly in 2021 female historical Wargamers are still fairly rare beasts, female fantasy gamers less so. The “wargaming in bed” chapter of Donald Featherstone’s Solo Wargaming also has that blokey jovial 70s “Carry on Nurse” humorous hospital world feel about man food, nurses and wives.

Anyway, whilst we are still 70s sitcom land, here are Peter Laing’s arguments for 15mm or what 15mm could do for you?

Perhaps the emerging smaller scales of 1/200 and 1/300 or 5mm were becoming a potential threat to tiny 15mm?

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Keep one ahead of the Jones’s

“Run two wargames periods. Try 15mm for your second string or better still, run to 15mm periods. Enjoy the advantages of this smaller scale, where the figures are still individuals, and you can have a larger area represented on your table. Peter Laing offers a choice of 6 different periods with over 180 items, and the range is still growing.”

“If you are a collector, and want a change from larger scales, why not try a mini diorama. A Marlburian cannon and eight crew, a mangonel and crew with a few Normans, or a Gatling Gun crew and eight Zulus, each group costing less than 60p and fitting into a space greater than 6cm x 3cm.”

“If she * (the little woman – Mum – the Wife – the Girl Friend – or the better half!) complains that your army or collection is taking up too much room (or you are spending too much money) then Peter Laing’s figures could be the answer …”

“The six periods covered (so far!) are: Ancients (500 BC), Feudals (11-12th Century) Marlburian (1700-1730), American War of Independence, English Civil War, Colonials (19th Century), and include infantry, cavalry, artillery and even a bagpiper!”

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F606 bagpiper marching and F605 Britain Officer marching – from my collection.

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These new Colonials 600 series get a favourable review from Donald Featherstone:

The “industrious Peter Laing” indeed!

Donald Featherstone writes in review: “Peter’s industry is to be admired because these small figures must take a fair amount of modelling and his range increases amazingly by the week. The latest issues include a nice little heliograph team plus additions to his Marlburian range …”

Image source: Wargamers Newsletter December 1973 https://fourcats.co.uk/mags/files/WGN-141-Dec-73.pdf

A605 British Heliographer – from my collection.

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I often think I would have less storage issues if I stuck to my 15mm Peter Laing collection, but then being an a Airfix kid of the 1970s still having many of my surviving 1:32 or 54mm and OOHO figures, I find far too many periods and scales interesting!

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By 26soldiersoftin

Hello I'm Mark Mr MIN, Man of TIN. Based in S.W. Britain, I'm a lifelong collector of "tiny men" and old toy soldiers, whether tin, lead or childhood vintage 1960s and 1970s plastic figures.
I randomly collect all scales and periods and "imagi-nations" as well as lead civilians, farm and zoo animals. I enjoy the paint possibilities of cheap poundstore plastic figures as much as the patina of vintage metal figures.
Befuddled by the maths of complex boardgames and wargames, I prefer the small scale skirmish simplicity of very early Donald Featherstone rules.
To relax, I usually play solo games, often using hex boards. Gaming takes second place to making or convert my own gaming figures from polymer clay (Fimo), home-cast metal figures of many scales or plastic paint conversions. I also collect and game with vintage Peter Laing 15mm metal figures, wishing like many others that I had bought more in the 1980s ...

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